STATS

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No Crosswalk

INJURY PREVENTION:

  • In 2009, 2,486 Florida residents were fatally injured in motor vehicle traffic crashes; there were another 14,828 hospitalizations for non-fatal injuries.
  • In Manatee County, there were 37 traffic-crash fatalities, or 11.62 per 100,000 population.
  • In 2009, the median hospital admissions charge for non-fatal traffic crash injuries was over $46,000, and admissions charges for the year totaled more than $1.2 billion.
  • Florida has been in the top 3 for most pedestrian and bicyclist fatalities every year since 2001.
  • In 2000, Tampa-St. Petersburg was named the deadliest metropolitan area for pedestrians.
  • In 2010, Manatee County had 2.48 traffic crash-related pedestrian fatalities per 100,000 population, compared to 1.84 in Sarasota County, 2.37 in Pasco County, and 3.42 in Hillsborough County.
  • In 2010, Manatee County had 45.2 traffic crash-related pedestrian injuries per 100,000 population, compared to 33.2 in Sarasota County, 32.7 in Pasco County, and 40.6 in Hillsborough County.
  • In 2010, Manatee County had 32.8 traffic crash-related cyclist injuries per 100,000 population, compared to 29.8 in Sarasota County, 28.8 in Pasco County, and 30.5 in Hillsborough County.
  • One reason for the high pedestrian and bicyclist injury and fatality rates in Florida is the shift from traditional roadways to multi-lane, high-speed streets meant to accommodate thousands of vehicles – not pedestrians.

     OBESITY PREVENTION:

  • For the first time in two centuries, this generation of American children could have a shorter life expectancy than their parents.
  • Childhood obesity has more than tripled in the past 30 years.
  • In Manatee County, almost 25% of youth and 60% of adults are overweight.
  • The majority of Americans do not meet national guidelines for physical activity.
  • Complete Streets encourage and facilitate physical activity through increased walking and biking to school or work, as well as walking to and from public transportation stations instead of driving for a full commute.
  • Many Americans are able to meet their weekly physical activity requirements through active transportation (walking or biking) to and from school or work.  
  • Complete Streets make it safer for children to walk and bike to school.  

     

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH:

  • Vehicle emissions pollute the air we breathe and contribute to health problems like asthma, pneumonia, lower respiratory infections, heart disease, and lung cancer.
  • Complete Streets lower traffic congestion on the roads by making it easier to engage in active transportation (walking or biking) or to access public transportation.

     

 

LOCAL ECONOMY:

  • Local businesses see more customers who may not have planned specifically to shop or dine at those establishments, but who were out walking or biking and decided to walk in on a whim.  Accessibility by foot, bicycle, or public transit also make stores and restaurants with limited parking much more inviting to the public. Traffic calming, wider sidewalks and bicycle lanes, and landscaping in downtown areas are measures that enhance residents’ and tourists’ desire to spend time outdoors and enter local establishments.
  • College students, young professionals, and adults with young children show a strong preference for safe, walkable communities in which to live.  Higher walkability ratings, meaning a neighborhood has safer and more facilitated access to sidewalks that lead to common destinations, increases home values by up to $3,000. 
  • Commuting by walking, bicycling, or riding public transit reduces transportation costs for commuters, while alleviating the stress incurred by heavy traffic congestion, and increases in public transit use brings in more money for the local economy.  When individuals and families save money in transportation, they are more able and likely to spend money at local shopping, dining, and entertainment venues, which boosts the local economy.

Increases in public transit use provide an opportunity for additional jobs in transit facilities.  Increased bicycling within a community allows for more jobs specific to bicycle shops and repairs.