Gallery of Common Environmental Complaints

This photo gallery illustrates some of the environmental quality issues we're asked to investigate. These photos are just a guide - not all of the photos illustrate activities requiring corrective action nor do they illustrate all of the problems we have had to resolve.

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Improper use of a hay bale for erosion control

Hay bales are not an effective erosion control device and we no longer recommend their use.

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Drop inlet with poor erosion and sedimentation protection

Drop inlets leading to completed roadside stormwater drainage must be effectively protected from sediment entry.

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Construction site without any erosion or sedimentation controls

Erosion and sedimentation controls are required at all construction sites.

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Roadside gutter filled by erosion from adjacent construction sites

Gutters filled with sediment cannot effectively drain stormwater. Sediment accumulations must be removed daily by sweeping, vacuuming, or manual means. Ideally, the sediment sources are controlled and eliminated, but this is not always practical on large projects where new roadways and stormwater systems are being constructed.

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Construction site entry with no erosion controls

Construction site entry points must not allow tracking of sediment off the site. There are several techniques for protecting site entry points. Consult the FDEP ESC manual, or discuss this with your ESC inspector.

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Silt fence on the perimeter of a construction site's disturbed area

Silt fences protect areas adjacent to a construction site from sediment runoff. They also control erosion on the construction site, or from its perimeter.

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Specialized silt fence installation for road widening project

The FDOT employs silt fences in unique ways for road widening projects. This particular installation pattern meets the needs of FDOT and this highway construction project.

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Algae bloom in an agricultural drainage system caused by excess nutrients

Too many nutrients in a stormwater system or receiving water body may cause an algae bloom.

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Typical turbidity control boom deployment

Floating yellow booms are used to control turbidity from construction projects in or around water bodies.

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A typical stormwater culvert such as those found at road crossings.

One of the most common structures in a stormwater system of any size are culverts used to convey storm water flows under road crossings or other obstacles.

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A typical stormwater "drop inlet" configuration used for road drainage

Roads are drained by stormwater inlets of several configurations. This type of "drop inlet" is set into the road bed where it receives water from the road's "curb and gutter" channels.

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Illicit dumping in wetlands harms the wetland and causes stormwater pollution

Illicit dumping of trash into a wetland harms the wetland and is source of pollution.

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A typical "finger canal"-style coastal development

A typical "Finger Canal"-style coastal development. Because of poor circulation inside the canals, water quality in these areas is normally poor.

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Fish kill in a stormwater pond caused by cold weather

Stormwater pond systems are not stable aquatic habitats. Cold snaps, heavy rainfall, or over use of herbicide treatments for aquatic plant control can result in fish kills. Stabilizing these systems to reduce the frequency of fish kills or other maintenance problems is more of an art that a science.

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Uncovered portions of this material handling and storage area are stormwater pollution threats

Commercial or industrial facilities that store materials or material handling equipment outdoors have to take steps to prevent pollutants from entering public storm sewer system or area water bodies. Some areas may need to be covered to protect them from rainfall. Other areas may need additional stormwater treatment. Our inspectors will assess this situation at facilities like the one shown in the photo.

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Canals are the largest structures in the municipal storm sewer system

Open stormwater canals are the largest structures in Manatee County's municipal storm sewer system.

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Algal growth in a roadside stormwater ditch
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Improperly labeled drums behind an commercial/industrial facility

All drums must be legibly and correctly labeled whether filled or empty. Storing drums outside, uncovered, accelerates deterioration of the drum.

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Over-filled waste oil collection tank at a commercial/industrial facility

Oil from this overfilled waste oil tank contaminated the soil and groundwater at the facility where it was located.

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Improved pasture immediately after an application of "dry-cake" type residuals

Wastewater residuals in "dry-cake" form have been applied to this improved pasture as a fertilizer and soil amendment.

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Typical temporary storage windrows for "dry-cake" residuals

A residuals hauler typically uses part of the permitted landspreading site for temporary storage of residuals prior to land application. "Dry-cake"-style residuals are usually formed into long "windrows" for storage.

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Improved pasture at a typical landspreading site

Improved pastures are the most common users of waste water residuals. These areas would not normally be fertilized due to the economics of ranching. Any livestock on the site are removed prior to residuals application.